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Online Library: Vitamin C

The following pages provide an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of vitamin C. This collection of scientific facts proves that anyone who privately or publicly questions the health value of micronutrients does not serve YOUR health, or the health of the people, but rather the multi-billion dollar investment 'business with disease' based on patented pharmaceutical drugs.

We encourage you to forward the link to this important online library on natural health – one of the largest ones in the world – to your friends. You may also print out the articles you find most important for your own health condition and share them with your doctor. Any responsibly acting health professional will be grateful to receive such science-based health education.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is extraordinarily sensitive to killing by a vitamin C-induced Fenton reaction.

Source: Nature Communications 2013; 4:1881. doi: 10.1038/ncomms2898

Author: Vilchèze C, Hartman T, Weinrick B, Jacobs WR Jr.

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461, USA.

Abstract: Drugs that kill tuberculosis more quickly could shorten chemotherapy significantly. In Escherichia coli, a common mechanism of cell death by bactericidal antibiotics involves the generation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. Here we show that vitamin C, a compound known to drive the Fenton reaction, sterilizes cultures of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. While M. tuberculosis is highly susceptible to killing by vitamin C, other Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens are not. The bactericidal activity of vitamin C against M. tuberculosis is dependent on high ferrous ion levels and reactive oxygen species production, and causes a pleiotropic effect affecting several biological processes. This study enlightens the possible benefits of adding vitamin C to an anti-tuberculosis regimen and suggests that the development of drugs that generate high oxidative burst could be of great use in tuberculosis treatment.

Effects of vitamin C and vitamin D administration on mood and distress in acutely hospitalized patients.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23885048

Author: Wang Y, Liu XJ, Robitaille L, Eintracht S, MacNamara E, Hoffer LJ.

Affiliation: Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Abstract: Hypovitaminosis C and D are highly prevalent in acute-care hospitals. Malnutrition with regard to these vitamins has been linked to mood disturbance and cognitive dysfunction. The objective was to determine whether vitamin C or D supplementation improves mood state or reduces psychological distress in acutely hospitalized patients with a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and D. A randomized, double-blind, active-control clinical trial compared the effects of vitamin C (500 mg twice daily) with those of high-dose vitamin D (5000 IU/d) on mood (Profile of Mood States) and psychological distress (Distress Thermometer). Vitamin C provided for a mean of 8.2 d increased plasma vitamin C concentrations to normal and was associated with a 71% reduction in mood disturbance and a 51% reduction in psychological distress. High-dose vitamin D provided for a mean of 8.1 d increased plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] concentrations, but not into the normal range, and had insignificant effects on mood and distress. The changes in mood and distress in the vitamin C group were greater than those in the vitamin D group. Conclusion: Short-term therapy with vitamin C improves mood and reduces psychological distress in acutely hospitalized patients with a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and D. No conclusion is possible regarding the effects of vitamin D because the dose and duration of therapy were insufficient to raise 25(OH) D concentrations into the normal range.

A Phytochemical-rich Multivitamin-multimineral Supplement Is Bioavailable and Reduces Serum Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein, Myeloperoxidase, and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in a Four-week Pilot trial of Healthy Individuals.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24808980

Author: Lerman RH, et al.

Affiliation: Functional Medicine Research Center, Research and Development, Metagenics, Inc, Gig Harbor, Washington, United States.

Abstract: A multivitamin-multimineral supplement combined with a diverse blend of bioactive phytochemicals may provide additional antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory property for overall health. This convenient feature may be useful for individuals who want to increase their intake of phytochemicals. The researchers conducted a pilot study in 15 healthy individuals (8 women and 7 men, mean age 41.7±14.9 years, mean body mass index 28.0±5.6) to investigate the effects of this novel formulation on biomarkers associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. After a 2-week diet that limited intake of fruits and vegetables to 2 servings/day, participants continued with the same restricted diet but began consuming 2 tablets of the study product for the subsequent 4 weeks. Fasting blood samples collected at week 2 and week 6 were analysed and compared using paired t-tests for levels of carotenoids, folate, vitamin B12, homocysteine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (oxLDL), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), F2-isoprostane, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and myeloperoxidase. Non-invasive peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT) was also measured. After 4 weeks of supplementation, plasma levels of carotenoids, folate, and vitamin B12, but not homocysteine, were significantly increased. Serum levels of oxLDL, PAI-1 and myeloperoxidase were significantly reduced, but F2-isoprostane, hs-CRP, and EndoPAT measures were unchanged compared with baseline. The study product was well tolerated. This nutritional supplement is bioavailable as indicated by the significant increase in plasma carotenoids, vitamin B12, and folate levels and may provide health benefits by significantly reducing serum levels of oxLDL, myeloperoxidase, and PAI-1 in healthy individuals.

Effect of high dose vitamin C on Epstein-Barr viral infection.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24793092

Author: Mikirova N, Hunninghake R.

Affiliation: Bio-Communication Research Institute, Riordan Clinic, Wichita, USA.

Abstract: Many natural compounds were tested for the ability to suppress viral replication. The present manuscript details an analysis of high dose vitamin C therapy on patients with EBV infection. The data were obtained from the patient history database at the Riordan Clinic. Among people in the database who were treated with intravenous vitamin C (7.5 g to 50 g infusions) between 1997 and 2006, 178 patients showed elevated levels of EBV EA IgG (range 25 to 211 AU) and 40 showed elevated levels of EBV VCA IgM (range 25 to 140 AU). Most of these patients had a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome, with the rest being diagnosed as having mononucleosis, fatigue, or EBV infection. The data provides evidence that high dose intravenous vitamin C therapy has a positive effect on disease duration and reduction of viral antibody levels. Plasma levels of ascorbic acid and vitamin D were correlated with levels of antibodies to EBV. The researchers found an inverse correlation between EBV VCA IgM and vitamin C in plasma in patients with mononucleosis and CFS meaning that patients with high levels of vitamin C tended to have lower levels of antigens in the acute state of disease. In addition, a relation was found between vitamin D levels and EBV EA IgG with lower levels of EBV early antigen IgG for higher levels of vitamin D. This clinical study of ascorbic acid and EBV infection showed the reduction in EBV EA IgG and EBV VCA IgM antibody levels over time during IVC therapy that is consistent with observations from the literature that millimolar levels of ascorbate hinder viral infection and replication in vitro.

Effect of vitamin C on endothelial function in health and disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24792921

Author: Ashor AW, et al.

Affiliation: Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle on Tyne, UK; College of Medicine, University of Al-Mustansiriyah, Baghdad, Iraq.

Abstract: Observational studies indicate that higher vitamin C intake is associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, randomised controlled trials (RCT) examining the effect of vitamin C on endothelial function (EF) have reported inconsistent results. The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to determine the effect of vitamin C supplementation on EF and to investigate whether the effect was influenced by health status, study duration, dose and route of vitamin C administration. The researchers searched the Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases from inception to May 2013 for studies that met the following criteria: 1) RCT with adult participants, 2) vitamin C administered alone, 3) studies that quantified EF using commonly applied methods including ultrasound, plethysmography and pulse wave analysis. Pooling the data from 44 clinical trials showed a significant positive effect of vitamin C on EF. Stratification of the analysis by health outcome revealed improved EF in atherosclerotic, diabetic and heart failure patients after vitamin C supplementation. The effect size appeared to be unaffected by study design, duration, baseline plasma vitamin C concentration or route of administration of vitamin C. The meta-regression showed a significant positive association between vitamin C dose and improvement in EF. Vitamin C supplementation improved EF. The effect of vitamin C supplementation appeared to be dependent on health status, with stronger effects in those at higher cardiovascular disease risk.