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Online Library: Pouchitis and probiotics

The following pages provide an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of micronutrients in fighting Pouchitis and probiotics. This collection of scientific facts proves that anyone who privately or publicly questions the health value of micronutrients does not serve YOUR health, or the health of the people, but rather the multi-billion dollar investment 'business with disease' based on patented pharmaceutical drugs.

We encourage you to forward the link to this important online library on natural health – one of the largest ones in the world – to your friends. You may also print out the articles you find most important for your own health condition and share them with your doctor. Any responsibly acting health professional will be grateful to receive such science-based health education.

Long-term use of probiotics lactobacillus and bifidobacterium has a prophylactic effect on the occurrence and severity of pouchitis: a randomized prospective study.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24579075

Author: Tomasz B, et al.

Affiliation: Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznañ, Poland.

Abstract: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of the long-term use of the composite probiotics in patients after restorative proctocolectomy. Forty-three patients (20 females and 23 males, aged 21 to 68 years) after restorative proctocolectomy were included in the study. After randomization patients were divided into placebo group and treatment group with oral intake of probiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Bifidobacterium bifidus. Patients were investigated during initial visit and during final visit after 9 months. All patients were subjected to standard clinical and endoscopic examination with microscopic study of the specimens. Concentrations of calprotectin and pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2-PK were determined in all cases. The average severity of pouchitis and the number of patients with pouchitis significantly decrease after 9 months of the probiotic taking. The concentrations of calprotectin and pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2-PK significantly decreased after the therapy. The conclusion is that nine months of the probiotic treatment (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Bifidobacterium bifidus) reduced the number of patients with pouchitis, decreased the PDAI score, and also decreased the fecal pyruvate kinase and calprotectin. The long-term probiotics use is safe and well accepted and can be an effective method of the pouchitis prevention.

Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei LP-33 in allergic rhinitis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (GA2LEN Study).

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24569538

Author: Costa DJ, et al.

Affiliation: Primary Care Department, University of Medicine, Montpellier I University, Montpellier, France.

Abstract: An imbalance between Th1 and Th2 cells is involved in allergic rhinitis (AR) that may be improved by probiotics. To test the efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei LP-33, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was carried out in patients with AR to grass pollen treated with loratadine and presenting altered quality of life. Subjects with persistent AR, symptomatic during the grass pollen season, and a positive skin test or specific immunoglobulin E to grass pollens were included by general practitioners (GPs). All received loratadine for 5 weeks. The primary end point was the improvement in Rhinitis Quality of Life (RQLQ) global score at the fifth week of LP-33 consumption compared with placebo (in addition to loratadine). Secondary end points included nasal and ocular symptoms (individual and total symptom scores), visual analogue scale and time of first exacerbation of the symptoms when loratadine was stopped. A total of 425 subjects were included. Using intent-to-treat analysis, the RQLQ global score decreased significantly more in the LP-33 group than in the placebo group. No significant differences were noted for the change of the rhinitis total symptom score 5 global score between groups. Significant differences in ocular symptoms (RQLQ) were observed between groups. This study performed by GPs shows that LP-33 improves the quality of life of subjects with persistent AR who are currently being treated with an oral H1-antihistamine. Whereas nasal symptoms had not changed, ocular symptoms had consistently improved.

Effect of Probiotics Supplementation on Bone Mineral Content and Bone Mass Density.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24587733

Author: Parvaneh K, et al.

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.

Abstract: A few studies in animals and a study in humans showed a positive effect of probiotic on bone metabolism and bone mass density. Most of the investigated bacteria were Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium . The positive results of the probiotics were supported by the high content of dietary calcium and the high amounts of supplemented probiotics. Some of the principal mechanisms include (1) increasing mineral solubility due to production of short chain fatty acids; (2) producing phytase enzyme by bacteria to overcome the effect of mineral depressed by phytate; (3) reducing intestinal inflammation followed by increasing bone mass density; (4) hydrolysing glycoside bond food in the intestines by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria. These mechanisms lead to increase bioavailability of the minerals. In conclusion, probiotics showed potential effects on bone metabolism through different mechanisms with outstanding results in the animal model. The results also showed that postmenopausal women who suffered from low bone mass density are potential targets to consume probiotics for increasing mineral bioavailability including calcium and consequently increasing bone mass density.

Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 on skin reactivity.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24322879

Author: Gueniche A, et al.

Affiliation: L'Oréal Research and Innovation, 1 avenue Eugène shueller, 93 601 Aulnay sous Bois, France; Nestle Research Center, Vers chez les Blancs, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract: In recent decades, the prevalence of subjects with reactive skin has considerably increased in industrialised countries. 50% of women and 30% of men report cutaneous discomfort classified under reactive/sensitive skin. Several topical approaches have been proposed, in particular through improvement of galenic forms or protection of epidermal surface. The researchers propose to act differently, deeply from inside the body via an innovative nutritional approach. To this purpose, Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 (ST11) was selected because of its specific beneficial skin properties discovered in in vitro studies, i.e. diminution of neurogenic inflammation and promotion of the recovery of skin barrier function. The researchers designed a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study with a two-month supplementation in two female treatment groups (n=32 per group). A capsaicin test was performed to monitor the time course of skin sensitivity. Moreover, trans-epidermal water loss was assessed to analyse the rate of skin barrier function recovery; dryness of the leg and roughness of the cheeks was investigated by a dermatologist as well as by self-assessment. The results of the present clinical trial show that oral supplementation with the probiotic decreases skin sensitivity and increases the rate of barrier function recovery. Thus, the data provide evidence that daily intake of ST11 could improve reactive skin condition.

Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® on health-related quality of life in college students affected by upper respiratory infections.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23020819

Author: Smith TJ, et al.

Affiliation: Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Health Related Professions, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

Abstract: College students are susceptible to upper respiratory infections (URI) due to inadequate sleep, stress and close living quarters. Certain probiotic strains modulate immune function and may improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) during URI. The present study recruited apparently healthy college students and assessed the effect of probiotics on HRQL outcomes (i.e. self-reported duration, symptom severity and functional impairment of URI) in those who developed URI. Missed school and work days due to URI were also considered. Subjects (n 231) were apparently healthy college students living on campus in residence halls at the Framingham State University (Framingham, MA, USA), and were randomised to receive placebo (n 117) or probiotic-containing powder (daily dose of minimum 1 billion colony-forming units of each Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® (LGG®) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®); n 114) for 12 weeks. Subjects completed The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 to assess HRQL during URI. The final analyses included 198 subjects (placebo, n 97 and probiotics, n 101). The median duration of URI was significantly shorter by 2 d and median severity score was significantly lower by 34% with probiotics v. placebo, indicating a higher HRQL during URI. Number of missed work days was not different between groups; however, the probiotics group missed significantly fewer school days compared to the placebo group. LGG® and BB-12® may be beneficial among college students with URI for mitigating decrements in HRQL. More research is warranted regarding mechanisms of action associated with these findings and the cost-benefit of prophylactic supplementation.

Evaluation of the immune benefits of two probiotic strains Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, BB-12® and Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei, L. casei 431® in an influenza vaccination model: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21899798

Author: Rizzardini G, et al.

Affiliation: Department of Infective Diseases, Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy.

Abstract: The present study investigated the ability of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (BB-12®) and Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei (L. casei 431®) to modulate the immune system using a vaccination model in healthy subjects. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted in 211 subjects (56 % females, mean age 33•2 (sd 13•1) years). Subjects consumed a minimum of 10⁹ colony-forming units of BB-12® (capsule) or L. casei 431® (dairy drink) or a matching placebo once daily for 6 weeks. After 2 weeks, a seasonal influenza vaccination was given. Plasma and saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 6 weeks for the analysis of antibodies, cytokines and innate immune parameters. Changes from baseline in vaccine-specific plasma IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 were significantly greater in both probiotic groups v. the corresponding placebo group. The number of subjects obtaining a substantial increase in specific IgG (defined as ≥ 2-fold above baseline) was significantly greater in both probiotic groups v. placebo. Significantly greater mean fold increases for vaccine-specific secretory IgA in saliva were observed in both probiotic groups v. placebo. Similar results were observed for total antibody concentrations. No differences were found for plasma cytokines or innate immune parameters. Data herein show that supplementation with BB-12® or L. casei 431® may be an effective means to improve immune function by augmenting systemic and mucosal immune responses to challenge.

Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® on health-related quality of life in college students affected by upper respiratory infections.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23020819

Author: Smith TJ, et al.

Affiliation: Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Health Related Professions, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

Abstract: College students are susceptible to upper respiratory infections (URI) due to inadequate sleep, stress and close living quarters. Certain probiotic strains modulate immune function and may improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) during URI. The present study recruited apparently healthy college students and assessed the effect of probiotics on HRQL outcomes (i.e. self-reported duration, symptom severity and functional impairment of URI) in those who developed URI. Missed school and work days due to URI were also considered. Subjects (n 231) were apparently healthy college students living on campus in residence halls at the Framingham State University (Framingham, MA, USA), and were randomised to receive placebo (n 117) or probiotic-containing powder (daily dose of minimum 1 billion colony-forming units of each Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® (LGG®) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®); n 114) for 12 weeks. Subjects completed The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 to assess HRQL during URI. The final analyses included 198 subjects (placebo, n 97 and probiotics, n 101). The median duration of URI was significantly shorter by 2 d and median severity score was significantly lower by 34% with probiotics v. placebo, indicating a higher HRQL during URI. Number of missed work days was not different between groups; however, the probiotics group missed significantly fewer school days compared to the placebo group. LGG® and BB-12® may be beneficial among college students with URI for mitigating decrements in HRQL. More research is warranted regarding mechanisms of action associated with these findings and the cost-benefit of prophylactic supplementation.

Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation for preventing respiratory infections in children: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23665598

Author: Liu S, et al.

Affiliation: Department of Public Health Microbiology, West China School of Public Health, Sichuan University, China.

Abstract: The objective of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of administering Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) for preventing respiratory infections in children, making use of systematic review and meta-analysis. Four RCTs involving 1805 participants met the inclusion criteria. Compared with placebo, LGG administration was associated with a reduced incidence of acute otitis media, a reduced risk of upper respiratory infections and antibiotic. There was no significant difference between the LGG and the control groups in the risk of overall respiratory infections and the incidence of lower respiratory infections. However, subgroup analysis of two studies on children older than 1 year showed significant reduction in the risk of overall respiratory infections. Adverse effects were similar in both groups. No serious adverse events were reported. The administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG compared with placebo has the potential to reduce the incidence of acute otitis media, the upper respiratory infections and antibiotic use in children.

Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections in children who attend day care centers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19896252

Author: Hojsak I, et al.

Affiliation: Referral Center for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.

Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the prevention of gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections in children who attend day care centres. The researchers conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 281 children who attend day care centres. They were randomly allocated to receive LGG at a dose of 10(9) colony-forming units in 100ml of a fermented milk product or placebo that was the same post-pasteurized fermented milk product without LGG during the 3-month intervention period. Compared to the placebo group, children in the LGG group had a significantly reduced risk of upper respiratory tract infections, a reduced risk of respiratory tract infections lasting longer than 3 days, and a significantly lower number of days with respiratory symptoms. There was no risk reduction in regard to lower respiratory tract infections. Compared with the placebo group, children in the LGG group had no significant reduction in the risk of gastrointestinal infections, vomiting episodes, and diarrheal episodes as well as no reduction in the number of days with gastrointestinal symptoms. The conclusion that can be drawn is that LGG administration can be recommended as a valid measure for decreasing the risk of upper respiratory tract infections in children attending day care centres.