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Online Library: Infection/Basics

The following pages provide an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of micronutrients in fighting Infections. This collection of scientific facts proves that anyone who privately or publicly questions the health value of micronutrients does not serve YOUR health, or the health of the people, but rather the multi-billion dollar investment 'business with disease' based on patented pharmaceutical drugs.

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Flu

The following pages provide an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of micronutrients in fighting cancer. This collection of scientific facts proves that anyone who privately or publicly questions the health value of micronutrients does not serve YOUR health, or the health of the people, but rather the multi-billion dollar investment 'business with disease' based on patented pharmaceutical drugs.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22040504

Author: Duan ZP, Jia ZH, Zhang J, Liu S, Chen Y, Liang LC, et al.

Affiliation: Beijing You-An Hospital, Capital Medical University, China.

Abstract: The 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection is associated with the high risk of severe complications and is spreading more rapidly throughout the world than other reported seasonal influenzas. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the nature herbal medicine Lianhuaqingwen capsule (LHC) in patients infected with influenza A (H1N1) virus. A total of 244 patients aged 16 - 65 years confirmed with influenza A (H1N1) virus infection by the real time RT-PCR were randomized to one of two treatment groups of 122 patients each. Each group assigned to receive either LHC or Oseltamivir for five days and observation for seven days. The patients were enrolled within 36 hours of illness onset if they had an axillary temperature of 37.4C and with at least one of the following symptoms: nasal obstruction, runny nose, cough, sore throat, fatigue, headache, myalgia, chills and sweating. The primary end point was the duration of illness. Of 244 patients, 240 (98.36%) patients with a median age 21 years completed the study between October 24, 2009 and November 23, 2009. There were no significant overall differences between LHC treated and Oseltamivir treated patients in the median duration of illness or the median duration of viral shedding. However, it was worthwhile to note that LHC significantly reduced the severity of illness and the duration of symptoms including fever, cough, sore throat, and fatigue. Both study medications were well tolerated. No drug related serious adverse events occurred during the study. Conclusion: Compared with Oseltamivir, LHC achieved a similar therapeutic effectiveness reduction of the duration of illness and duration of viral shedding. Therefore, LHC might be an alternative therapeutic measure for influenza A (H1N1) virus infections.

Chinese herbs in treatment of influenza: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20573492

Author: Wang L, Zhang RM, Liu GY, Wei BL, Wang Y, Cai HY, Li FS, Xu YL, Zheng SP, Wang G.

Affiliation: Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of China.

Abstract: The objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of Antiwei, a traditional Chinese prescription, in the treatment of influenza. In a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, the authors recruited 480 adults aged 18 to 65 years within 36 h of onset of influenza-like symptoms. There were 225 patients with confirmed influenza. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 6 g of Antiwei (n = 360) or placebo (n = 120) twice daily for three days. All patients recorded their temperature and symptoms on diary cards during treatment. Analyses were performed in both the influenza-like population and the influenza-confirmed population. Antiwei increased patients' recovery by 17%, and reduced the severity of illness measured by the median symptom score by 50% in both the influenza-like and the influenza-confirmed populations, compared to placebo. The influenza-confirmed patients reported reductions in the severity of fever, cough and expectoration after one-day of treatment with Antiwei, compared to placebo. The adverse event profiles were similar for Antiwei and placebo. Conclusion: Antiwei was effective and well tolerated in treatment of natural influenza infection in adults. Antiwei represents a clinically valuable intervention in the management of influenza.