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Online Library: Heart Failure

The following pages provide an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of micronutrients in fighting heart failure. This collection of scientific facts proves that anyone who privately or publicly questions the health value of micronutrients does not serve YOUR health, or the health of the people, but rather the multi-billion dollar investment 'business with disease' based on patented pharmaceutical drugs.

We encourage you to forward the link to this important online library on natural health – one of the largest ones in the world – to your friends. You may also print out the articles you find most important for your own health condition and share them with your doctor. Any responsibly acting health professional will be grateful to receive such science-based health education.

Plasma vitamin C predicts incident heart failure in men and women in European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk prospective study.

Source: American heart journal 2011; 162(2):246-53.

Author: Pfister R, Sharp SJ, Luben R, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT.

Affiliation: Department III of Internal Medicine, Heart Centre of the University of Cologne, Germany.

Abstract: Fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with lower risk for cardiovascular risk factors and disease, but data on heart failure are sparse and inconsistent. The association of plasma vitamin C, a biomarker reflecting fruit and vegetable intake, with heart failure has not been studied. The authors examined the prospective association of plasma vitamin C concentrations with incident fatal and nonfatal heart failure events in apparently healthy 9,187 men and 11,112 women aged 39 to 79 years participating in the "European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition" study in Norfolk. The risk of heart failure decreased with increasing plasma vitamin C. Every 20 mol/L increase in plasma vitamin C concentration was associated with a 9% relative reduction in risk of heart failure after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, occupational social class, educational level, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol concentration, and body mass index, with similar result if adjusting for interim coronary heart disease. Conclusions: Plasma vitamin C, a biomarker reflecting fruit and vegetable intake, was inversely associated with the risk of heart failure in this healthy population. This observation should be regarded as hypothesis generating for further prospective trials aimed at examining the effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables for prevention of heart failure.

Plasma vitamin C predicts incident heart failure in men and women in European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk prospective study.

Source: American Heart Journal 2011; 162(2):246-53.

Author: Pfister R, Sharp SJ, Luben R, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT.

Affiliation: Department III of Internal Medicine, Heart Centre of the University of Cologne, Germany.

Abstract: Fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with lower risk for cardiovascular risk factors and disease, but data on heart failure are sparse and inconsistent. The association of plasma vitamin C, a biomarker reflecting fruit and vegetable intake, with heart failure has not been studied. The researchers examined the prospective association of plasma vitamin C concentrations with incident fatal and nonfatal heart failure events in apparently healthy 9,187 men and 11,112 women aged 39 to 79 years participating in the "European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition" study in Norfolk. The risk of heart failure decreased with increasing plasma vitamin C. Every 20 μmol/L increase in plasma vitamin C concentration (1 SD) was associated with a 9% relative reduction in risk of heart failure after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, occupational social class, educational level, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol concentration, and body mass index, with similar result if adjusting for interim coronary heart disease. Conclusion: Plasma vitamin C, a biomarker reflecting fruit and vegetable intake, was inversely associated with the risk of heart failure in this healthy population. This observation should be regarded as hypothesis generating for further prospective trials aimed at examining the effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables for prevention of heart failure.

Fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acids and risk of heart failure: a meta-analysis.

Source: Clin Nutr. 2012 Dec;31(6):846-53.

Author: Djouss L, Akinkuolie AO, Wu JH, Ding EL, Gaziano JM.

Affiliation: Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA.

Abstract: While marine omega-3 fatty acids have been associated with a lower mortality in heart failure patients, data on omega-3 and incident heart failure are inconsistent. The authors systematically reviewed the evidence on the association of omega-3 fatty acids and fish intake with the incidence of heart failure in this meta-analysis. The authors identified relevant studies by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to August 31, 2011 without restrictions and by reviewing reference lists from retrieved articles. A total of 176,441 subjects and 5480 incident cases of heart failure from 7 prospective studies were included in this analysis. Conclusion: This meta-analysis is consistent with a lower risk of heart failure with intake of marine omega-3 fatty acids. These observational findings should be confirmed in a large randomized trial.

Fatty fish, marine omega-3 fatty acids and incidence of heart failure.

Source: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jun;64(6):587-94.

Author: Levitan EB, Wolk A, Mittleman MA.

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Public Health, Birmingham, USA.

Abstract: Marine omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. Consumption of fatty fish and marine omega-3 has been associated with lower rates of cardiovascular diseases. The authors examined the association of fatty fish and marine omega-3 with heart failure (HF) in a population of middle-aged and older women. Participants in the Swedish Mammography Cohort aged 48-83 years completed 96-item food-frequency questionnaires. Women without any history of HF, myocardial infarction or diabetes at baseline (n=36,234) were followed from 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2006 for HF hospitalization or mortality through Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers; 651 women experienced HF events. Conclusion: Moderate consumption of fatty fish (1-2 servings per week) and marine omega-3 fatty acids were associated with a lower rate of first HF hospitalization or death in this population.

Fish consumption, marine omega-3 fatty acids, and incidence of heart failure: a population-based prospective study of middle-aged and elderly men.

Source: Eur Heart J. 2009 Jun;30(12):1495-500.

Author: Levitan EB, Wolk A, Mittleman MA.

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 375 Longwood Avenue, Boston, USA.

Abstract: Fatty fish and marine omega-3 fatty acids were associated with lower rates of heart failure (HF) among US elderly, but this has not been confirmed in broader age ranges or other populations where source and type of fish may differ. The authors therefore conducted a population-based, prospective study of 39 367 middle-aged and older Swedish men. Diet was measured using food-frequency questionnaires. Men were followed for HF through Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers from 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2004. Conclusion: In this population, moderate intake of fatty fish and marine omega-3 fatty acids was associated with lower rates of HF, though the association for fish intake was not statistically significant; higher intake was not associated with additional benefit.

The Effect of Vitamin D on Aldosterone and Health Status in Patients with Heart Failure

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24508026

Author: Boxer RS, Hoid BD, et al.

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado; Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Abstract: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with HF events and in animal models vitamin D down-regulates RAAS hormones. Patients with NYHA II-IV HF and a 25OHD level 37.5 ng/mL received weekly vitamin D3 50,000 IU (n=31) or placebo (n=33) for 6 months. Serum aldosterone, renin, echocardiography and health status were collected at baseline and 6 months. Mean age of participants 65.910.4 years, women 48%, AA 64%, mean EF 37.613.9, NYHA class III 36 %, II 64%. The vitamin D group increased serum 25OHD (19.1 9.3 to 61.720.3 ng/ml) and not in the placebo group (17.89.0 to 17.49.8 ng/ml). Aldosterone decreased in the vitamin D group (10.011.9 to 6.211.6 ng/dl) and not in the placebo group 8.98.6 to 9.012.4 ng/dl). There was no difference between groups in renin, echocardiographic measures or health status from baseline to 6 months. Modelling indicated that variables which predicted change in aldosterone included receiving vitamin D, increasing age, AA race, and lower GFR. Conclusion: Vitamin D3 repletion decreases aldosterone in patients with HF and low serum vitamin D. Vitamin D may be an important adjunct to standard HF therapy.