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Online Library: Endometriosis

The following pages provide an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of micronutrients in fighting Endometriosis. This collection of scientific facts proves that anyone who privately or publicly questions the health value of micronutrients does not serve YOUR health, or the health of the people, but rather the multi-billion dollar investment 'business with disease' based on patented pharmaceutical drugs.

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A prospective cohort study of Vitamins B, C, E, and multivitamin intake and endometriosis.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24511373

Author: Darling AM1, Chavarro JE2, Malspeis S3, Harris HR4, Missmer SA5.

Affiliation: 1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA - USA. 2Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA - USA ; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA - USA ; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA - USA. 3Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA - USA. 4Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA - USA ; Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm - Sweden. 5Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA - USA ; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA - USA ; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA - USA.

Abstract: Diet is a potentially modifiable risk factor for endometriosis. It has been hypothesized that vitamins C, E, and the B vitamins may influence factors involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis, such as oxidative stress and steroid hormone metabolism. In this large, prospective cohort study, we examined the relation between intake of vitamins C, E, the B vitamins, and the use of multivitamin supplements and diagnosis of endometriosis. Data were collected from women in the Nurses' Health Study II between 1991 and 2005. Diet was assessed via food frequency questionnaire. Incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using time-varying Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 1383 incident cases of laparoscopically-confirmed endometriosis were observed among 70,617 women during 735,286 person years of follow-up. Intakes of thiamine (B1), folate (B9), vitamin C, and vitamin E solely from food sources were inversely related to endometriosis diagnosis. However, intakes of these nutrients from supplements alone were unrelated to endometriosis. Thiamine, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin E from food sources are inversely related to endometriosis risk. The results suggest that the protective mechanism may not be related to the nutrients themselves but rather other components of foods rich in these micronutrients or factors correlated with diets high in these vitamin-rich foods.